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SD.Kfz. 8 & SD.Kfz. 9 Schwerer Zugkraftwagen (1...
16,50 € *
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Illustrated history of the deployment of German half-track vehicles by the Wehrmacht, Luftwaffe and Waffen-SS during WW2, serving as personnel carriers, tractors, combat engineering vehicles and self-propelled carriages for anti-aircraft guns.

Anbieter: buecher
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Jagdgeschwader 53
34,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Jagdgeschwader 53 (JG 53) Pik-As was a Luftwaffe fighter-wing of World War II. It operated in Western Europe and in the Mediterranean. Jagdgeschwader 53 - or as it was better known, the "Pik As" (Ace of Spades) Geschwader - was one of the oldest German fighter units of World War II with its origins going back to 1937. JG53 flew the various models of Bf-109 throughout the second world war.The Geschwader commenced its wartime operations with a high proportion of its personnel experienced ex Condor Legion pilots. Including Oblt. Werner Mölders , Staffelkapitän of 1./JG 53 based at Wiesbaden. On 14 May 1940 JG 53 claimed some 43 on that one day.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Fritz X (air-launched anti-ship missile)
34,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Fritz X was the most common name for a German air- launched anti-ship missile, used during World War II. Fritz X was a nickname used both by Allied and Luftwaffe personnel. Alternate names include Ruhrstahl SD 1400 X, Kramer X-1, PC 1400X or FX 1400 (the latter is also the origin for the name "Fritz X"). Along with the USAAF's similar Azon weapon of the same period in World War II, it is one of the precursors of today's anti-ship missiles and precision-guided weapons.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Battle of Britain
39,00 € *
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Battle of Britain. Aircraft of the Battle of Britain, Non-British personnel in the RAF during the Battle of Britain, Corpo Aereo Italiano, The Blitz, Battle of Britain airfields, RAF Fighter Command Order of Battle 1940, Luftwaffe Order of Battle August 1940, No. 66 Squadron RAF, List of officially accredited Battle of Britain squadrons

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Operation Winter Storm
45,00 € *
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High Quality Content by WIKIPEDIA articles! Operation Winter Storm (German: Unternehmen Wintergewitter) was a German offensive in World War II undertaken between 12 23 December 1942, in which the German Fourth Panzer Army attempted to relieve encircled Axis forces during the Battle of Stalingrad. In late November 1942, the Red Army completed Operation Uranus, encircling Axis personnel in and around the city of Stalingrad. German forces within the Stalingrad pocket and directly outside were reorganized under Army Group Don, under the command of Field Marshal Erich von Manstein. As the Red Army continued to build strength, in an effort to allocate as many resources as possible to the eventual launch of the planned Operation Saturn, which aimed to isolate Army Group A from the rest of the German Army, the Luftwaffe had begun an attempt to supply German forces in Stalingrad through an air bridge. However, as the Luftwaffe proved incapable of carrying out its mission and it became more obvious that a successful breakout could only occur if it was launched as early as possible, Manstein decided to plan and launch a dedicated relief effort.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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NATO Dispersed Operating Bases
49,00 € *
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Dispersal tactics and protective measures were very common during World War II and practiced by all nations. The USAAF was less concerned than its allies about base defence and dispersal due to the total air superiority and unlimited resources of aircraft, aircrews and ground personnel to replace combat losses. After D-Day as allied tactical air forces moved rapidly across France, investment in base and aircraft survival was impractical. It was quicker and cheaper to use captured Luftwaffe facilities. By 1948 these small airfields had been abandoned and most structures were removed or were in a state of disrepair.

Anbieter: Dodax
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Unflinching Zeal
49,90 CHF *
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Noted aviation historian Robin Higham examines the evolution of the Armée de l'Air and RAF during the interwar period. Although France and England shared a mutual enemy in Germany, the development of the air forces of in each nation shared few commonalities. Higham demonstrates that the Armée de l'Terre dominated strategic and doctrinal planning in France. The resulting emphasis on traditional land warfare, combined with the volatility of French politics in 1920s, blunted the development of French air forces. By 1940, they were ill prepared, technologically inferior, and out manned when the Luftwaffe aircraft darkened the skies over the French countryside. Although the causes of the defeat of France in 1940 have been debated by historians, none have focused on the role and place of the Armée de l'Air in that defeat. Historians of France have been much more comfortable arguing about politics and the Armée de Terre. As Higham illustrates, however, it is important understand the impact of the development of the Armée de l'Air, its doctrine, equipment, personnel, and budgets. Comparatively, the success of the Royal Air Force in the skies over Britain was due largely to the fact that the independent RAF evolved into a sophisticated, scientifically based force, supported by consistent government practices. Higham's thorough examination, however, finds the British not without error in the two decades that followed the Treaty of Versailles. But strong government support and technological innovation during this period paved the way for success once the war began.

Anbieter: Orell Fuessli CH
Stand: 11.07.2020
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Unflinching Zeal
47,70 € *
ggf. zzgl. Versand

Noted aviation historian Robin Higham examines the evolution of the Armée de l'Air and RAF during the interwar period. Although France and England shared a mutual enemy in Germany, the development of the air forces of in each nation shared few commonalities. Higham demonstrates that the Armée de l'Terre dominated strategic and doctrinal planning in France. The resulting emphasis on traditional land warfare, combined with the volatility of French politics in 1920s, blunted the development of French air forces. By 1940, they were ill prepared, technologically inferior, and out manned when the Luftwaffe aircraft darkened the skies over the French countryside. Although the causes of the defeat of France in 1940 have been debated by historians, none have focused on the role and place of the Armée de l'Air in that defeat. Historians of France have been much more comfortable arguing about politics and the Armée de Terre. As Higham illustrates, however, it is important understand the impact of the development of the Armée de l'Air, its doctrine, equipment, personnel, and budgets. Comparatively, the success of the Royal Air Force in the skies over Britain was due largely to the fact that the independent RAF evolved into a sophisticated, scientifically based force, supported by consistent government practices. Higham's thorough examination, however, finds the British not without error in the two decades that followed the Treaty of Versailles. But strong government support and technological innovation during this period paved the way for success once the war began.

Anbieter: Thalia AT
Stand: 11.07.2020
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